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Russian Federation


IRegs for LIVE Animals

Notice: If you have any questions or concerns regarding the procedures and requirements for exporting animals, you should contact the VS Field Office covering the area from which the animal will be exported, the area in which your office is located.


Save Time and Money with VEHCS!

"Orange Banner" Country

Accredited Veterinarians can submit health certificates for USDA endorsement electronically through VEHCS (Veterinary Export Health Certification System).

However, this country requires USDA to ink-sign and emboss the health certificate. This means the final, endorsed health certificate that travels with the animal(s) must be mailed back to you.
Before going to VEHCS: Scroll below this banner to view animal-specific requirements.

To process some health certificates, VEHCS may need the Accredited Veterinarian to upload the completed fillable PDF version found in the requirements section of this page. Either save a copy of the PDF below, or return to this page for the health certificate, if prompted by VEHCS.


Accredited Veterinarians, log in here if you wish to use VEHCS.
Accredited Veterinarians, help with using VEHCS is available on the VEHCS Help Page.
Learn how to issue a health certificate using VEHCS (A Step-by-step Guide).
NOTE: The endorsed health certificate (paper, not electronic) must accompany the shipment. The endorsed health certificate will be returned by mail (a pre-paid, pre-addressed return label must be provided during certificate submission).

Equine

Note: Effective August 27, 2014, there is a temporary restriction on animals from Colorado and Texas due to the ongoing outbreak of vesicular stomatitis. Russia has prohibited the U.S. export of horses or other single-hoofed ungulates, cattle, sheep, goats, pigs and semen and embryos of these species. Also included in the restriction are wild, zoo, and circus animals susceptible to vesicular stomatitis.

Note: Effective September 5, 2012, Russia has banned U.S. export of horses, cattle, sheep, swine, and semen and embryos from donors in Mora County, New Mexico.

Cattle

Note: At Russia’s request, USDA is negotiating new certification statements regarding bluetongue disease (BT) for cattle and small ruminants. Russia has requested quarantine in manners that control exposure to the BT competent vector and has also asked for BT testing. APHIS is developing a counter proposal. APHIS expects to use the current bilingual veterinary health certificates posted below with an addendum for the additional BT requirements.

Note: Until negotiations are complete, it is not clear to USDA what Russia will require. U.S. exporters wishing to pursue trade in the interim should contact the USDA APHIS-VS-Live Animal Import Export Unit at 301-851-3300.

Note: Effective August 27, 2014, there is a temporary restriction on animals from Colorado and Texas due to the ongoing outbreak of vesicular stomatitis. Russia has prohibited the U.S. export of horses or other single-hoofed ungulates, cattle, sheep, goats, pigs and semen and embryos of these species. Also included in the restriction are wild, zoo, and circus animals susceptible to vesicular stomatitis.

Note: Effective September 5, 2012, Russia has banned U.S. export of horses, cattle, sheep, swine, and semen and embryos from donors in Mora County, New Mexico.

Sheep and Goats

Note: At Russia’s request, USDA is negotiating new certification statements regarding bluetongue disease (BT) for cattle and small ruminants. Russia has requested quarantine in manners that control exposure to the BT competent vector and has also asked for BT testing. APHIS is developing a counter proposal. APHIS expects to use the current bilingual veterinary health certificates posted below with an addendum for the additional BT requirements.

Note: Until negotiations are complete, it is not clear to USDA what Russia will require. U.S. exporters wishing to pursue trade in the interim should contact the USDA APHIS-VS-Live Animal Import Export Unit at 301-851-3300.

Note: Effective August 27, 2014, there is a temporary restriction on animals from Colorado and Texas due to the ongoing outbreak of vesicular stomatitis. Russia has prohibited the U.S. export of horses or other single-hoofed ungulates, cattle, sheep, goats, pigs and semen and embryos of these species. Also included in the restriction are wild, zoo, and circus animals susceptible to vesicular stomatitis.

Note: Effective September 5, 2012, Russia has banned U.S. export of horses, cattle, sheep, swine, and semen and embryos from donors in Mora County, New Mexico.

Swine

Note: Effective May 30, 2014, Russia has banned import of live pigs from the United States due to the detection of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea (PED). (Confirmed: June 22, 2021)

Poultry / Birds

Note: Russia has imposed temporary restrictions on imports and transits of live birds, poultry, day-old chicks, and hatching eggs originating from the states of South Carolina, Delaware, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, South Dakota, Iowa, Missouri, Wisconsin, Kansas, Minnesota, Maine, Nebraska, New York, North Dakota, North Carolina, Texas, Montana, Colorado, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Idaho, Utah, Washington, Oregon, Oklahoma, and New Jersey, due to HPAI. 

For all other U.S. origin shipments of poultry originating from U.S. states other than South Carolina, Delaware, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, South Dakota, Iowa, Missouri, Wisconsin, Kansas, Minnesota, Maine, Nebraska, New York, North Dakota, North Carolina, Texas, Montana, Colorado, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Idaho, Utah, Washington, Oregon, Oklahoma, and New Jersey, the following statement must be added to the corresponding veterinary certificates: "Except from the states of South Carolina, Delaware, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, South Dakota, Iowa, Missouri, Wisconsin, Kansas, Minnesota, Maine, Nebraska, New York, North Dakota, North Carolina, Texas, Montana, Colorado, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Idaho, Utah, Washington, Oregon, Oklahoma, New Jersey" in regard to avian influenza. This statement must be validated by a signature of the issuing USDA-accredited veterinarian. An updated model certificate has been posted below for use in trade, until such time as the temporary restrictions are lifted.  

Effective July 17, 2014, all exports of hatching eggs (including SPF eggs) to the Russian Federation must be pre-notified by APHIS. Ask your APHIS VS Endorsement Office to send scanned copies of the endorsed veterinary health certificates to notification-us@fsvps.ru.  This information must be sent on-line to the e-mail address above before the shipment arrives in Russia. Starting on July 17, 2014, shipments arriving at Russian Federation entry points without the electronic pre-notification by APHIS will be returned, by Russia, to the sender.

Aquatic Animals

APHIS Registered Aquaculture Export Facility approval is required for the export of aquatic animals caught in natural water bodies.

Research / Laboratory Animals

Note: Effective June 2, 2022, in response to the monkeypox global outbreak, the Russian Federal Service for Veterinary and Phytosanitary Surveillance (VPSS) has placed a ban on the import and transit of all rodents and primates, except for laboratory animals and those returning to the Russian Federation (pets), from all countries. Pre-export testing for monkeypox of laboratory rodents and primates may be required.

Other Animals

Note: Effective August 27, 2014, there is a temporary restriction on animals from Colorado and Texas due to the ongoing outbreak of vesicular stomatitis. Russia has prohibited the U.S. export of horses or other single-hoofed ungulates, cattle, sheep, goats, pigs and semen and embryos of these species. Also included in the restriction are wild, zoo, and circus animals susceptible to vesicular stomatitis.​​

Pets

Visit the APHIS Pet Travel Website for information about exporting your pets.

For species not listed, the requirements are not known.  However, exporters wanting to ship livestock and/or germplasm, whose requirements are not listed above, should have the interested party (importer/buyer) in the country of destination apply for an Import Permit at the appropriate ministry.  This Import Permit will most likely outline the specific requirements.


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