CT_Nd_israel0301e

Newcastle Disease_ Israel_ 3_01

CEI LogoNewcastle Disease, Israel, March 2001

Impact Worksheet

Summary:

On March 6, 2001, Israel reported to OIE an outbreak of Newcastle disease affecting a table egg production flock. Israel's last outbreak of Newcastle disease was in April of 1997. There were no products that would be at risk for transmission of Newcastle disease imported into the US from Israel during the year 2000. Israel export market in live poultry and poultry products is a small percent of the world market. Given the limited amount of exports from Israel of poultry products that could be at risk for transmission of Newcastle disease and given the lack of US imports of relevant products, the risk to the US due to this outbreak is negligible.

Recommendations at this time: none.

How extensive is the situation in the affected country and what was the country’s disease status prior to the outbreak?

On March 6, 2001, Israel reported an outbreak of Newcastle disease affecting a table egg production flock in the Beersheba district

ND Israelmap.

(The town of Beersheba is indicated on the map by a black dot in the central part of the country.) The outbreak was first detected on February 4 and the flock has since been destroyed. Israel's last outbreak of Newcastle disease was in April of 1997.
Source: OIE Disease Information Report

What is the country’s production and trade in affected animals and animal products?

In 2000, Israel had live chicken stocks of 28 million (Table A), and exported 4.2 million chickens. Israel ranked 9th in the world for live turkey stocks, with 2% of the world’s stocks. Total exports of live turkeys amounted to $8.3 million. Most 1999 exports of live turkeys (as breeding stock) went to Turkey and Poland. Live duck and goose numbers accounted for less than 1% of world stocks.

Table A: Stocks of Live Animals, Israel

Live Animals

2000 Stocks

Numbers

% World

Chickens

28,000,000

0.2

Ducks

200,000

Geese

1,400,000

0.6

Turkeys

4,900,000

2.0


Sources: United Nations FAO, USDA
FAS Attaché Report 2000

Israel produced 195,000 metric tons of chicken meat and 86,000 metric tons of turkey meat in 2000 (Table B), ranking 8th in world turkey meat production in 2000. Most turkey meat exports in 1999 went to France. Israel ranked 6th in world goose meat exports, accounting for 1.5% of the world’s goose meat exports. The lack of imports is likely due to the stringent kosher demands of the Council of the Chief Rabbinate of Israel.

Table B: Production and Trade in Relevant Products, Israel

Products

2000 Production, provisional

Trade

1999 Exports

1999 Imports

Metric ton

% World

Metric ton

% World

Metric ton

% World

Chicken Meat

195,000

0.3

20

0

0

Duck Meat

390

0

0

0

0

Turkey Meat

86,000

1.8

1,349

0.2

0

0

Goose Meat

5,100

0.3

690

1.5

0

0

Eggs

91,800

0.2

2,990

0.2

240

Source: United Nations FAO, USDA FAS Attaché Report 2000

What are the US imports of affected animals or animal products from the country?

There were no products that would be at risk for transmission of Newcastle disease imported from Israel during the year 2000. The only relevant US imports from Israel reported in 1999 was 206,071 kg of "chicken cuts and edible offal (including livers), frozen".

Source: World Trade Atlas

What is the level of passenger traffic arriving in the United States from the affected country?

Just over one million passengers arrived in the US on direct flights from Israel in 1999 . As part of APHIS-PPQ’s Agriculture Quarantine Inspection Monitoring, 923 air passengers from Israel were inspected for items of agricultural interest. Of these, 20, or 2.2 %, were found to be carrying a total of 26.6 kg of unspecified meat products. No passengers were found to be carrying poultry specific products. None of the passengers found with meat items reported plans to visit or work on a farm or ranch while in the US. Reported destination states of these 20 passengers were FL, IL, MA, NY, PA, and TX.

Source: US Department of Transportation, and APHIS-PPQ Agricultural Quarantine Inspection data base

CEI’s plans for follow up:

CEI has no plans for follow up on this issue, other than continuing to monitor the situation. If you seek more information or wish to comment on this worksheet, please reply to this message or contact Vicki Bridges at (970) 490-7822 or Ken Geter at (970) 490-7817 .

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