CT_Hpaigermany0516

HPAI Germany_ 5_16_03

CEI Logo Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza , Germany , May 16, 2003

Impact Worksheet

Summary:

A suspected outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in Germany was reported to the OIE on May 9, 2003 and confirmed on May 13, 2003. Genetic analysis indicates the virus corresponds to the virus which caused the HPAI outbreak in the Netherlands on March 01, 2003. Control measures include the culling of all poultry on the affected farm and on farms within a 3-kilometer zone around the affected farm. A ban on movement of live poultry, hatching eggs, and manure in the state of North Rhine-Westphalia was also imposed. The last reported outbreak of HPAI in Germany was in 1979.

Germany has 120 million head of poultry, 1, 6, 24 and 9 percent of EU stocks of chickens, ducks, geese and turkeys, respectively. Germany has less than 1 percent of world stocks of chickens, ducks, and geese, but 4 percent of world turkey stocks. Germany produces almost 17 percent of EU egg production and a 1.5 percent of world egg production. Exports of live poultry, poultry meat, poultry liver, and eggs were valued at $540 million in 2001. Exports of live chickens, geese and turkeys accounted for 12, 2, and 15 percent, respectively, of total world exports of these products. Germany’s exports of poultry liver, poultry meat and eggs account for 19, 2 and 7 percent, respectively, of world exports.

The US imported no live poultry, poultry meat, or eggs from Germany in 2002 or Jan-Feb. 2003, but did import almost 1,600 other live birds in that time period. All live poultry and other bird species imported into the US (except from Canada) are required to have a USDA issued import permit, a health certificate issued by a government veterinarian in the country of origin, and be quarantined for 30 days in a USDA animal import quarantine facility. Testing for communicable diseases of poultry is completed during the quarantine.

How extensive is HPAI in Germany, and what was Germany’s disease status prior to the outbreak?

An outbreak of HPAI in Germany was reported to the OIE on May 13, 2003. The outbreak occurred on a chicken farm in Schwalmtal/ Viersen in the State of Northrhine-Westphalia (see red flag on map). The genetic sequence of this virus is consistent with the avian influenza virus subtype H7. The virus corresponds to the avian influenza virus that caused the outbreak in the Netherlands on March 01, 2003. HPAI was diagnosed on a Dutch farm that was only 1.5 kilometers from the German border and the spread of the virus to Germany was not surprising.

HPAI Germany

The destruction of 32,000 chickens on the affected farm and 41,000 chickens from seven neighboring farms in a circle of 3 kilometers around the affected farm were undertaken on May 9, 2003 . Additional control measures include a ban on movement of live poultry, hatching eggs, and poultry manure in the state of North Rhine-Westphalia, and a ban on free-range poultry production.

The last reported outbreak of HPAI in Germany was in 1979.

Source: OIE Disease Information Report, USDA FAS Gain Report #GM3013

What is Germany ’s place in the international market for poultry and poultry products?

Germany has 120 million head of poultry, accounting for 1, 6, 24 and 9 percent, of EU stocks of chickens, ducks, geese and turkeys (Table 1). In terms of world poultry stocks and production, Germany accounts for over 3 percent of world production of turkeys, but for other types of poultry Germany is a minor world player. Germany produces 17 percent of EU egg production but only 1.5 percent of world egg production.

Table 1: Poultry Stocks and Production, Germany , 2001 and 2002

2001

2002

Stocks or Production

Stocks or Production

% of EU Stocks or Production

% of World Production

1,000 Head

Chickens

108,000

109,993

1.1%

0.7%

Ducks

1,900

1,900

6.1%

0.2%

Geese

400

400

24.3%

0.2%

Turkeys

8,800

8,800

8.9%

3.6%

Metric Ton

Eggs

890,000

886,600

16.9%

1.5%

Source: United Nations FAO

Germany exported live poultry, poultry meat, poultry liver, and eggs valued at $540 million in 2001 (Table 2). Exports of live chickens, geese and turkeys accounted for 12, 2, and 15 percent, respectively, of total world exports of these products. Germany’s exports of poultry liver, poultry meat and eggs were 19, 2 and 7 percent, respectively, of world exports.


Table 2: Exports of Live Poultry and Poultry Products, Germany, 2001

Exports

2001

Quantity

(1,000 head or mt)

Value

(1000 US $)

% of World Quantity

% of World Value

Chickens (hd)

94,131

125,530

11.9%

15.4%

Geese (hd)

16

118

2.2%

4.9%

Turkeys (hd)

7,003

13,756

14.9%

13.2%

Poultry Meat (mt)

187,726

334,699

1.9%

2.9%

Poultry Eggs (mt)

67,178

65,512

6.8%

6.6%

Liver: Duck, Goose & Chicken (mt)

4,411

3,675

19.4%

2.0%

Source: United Nations FAO

What are the US imports of poultry or poultry products from Germany?

Germany is not considered by the US to be free of exotic Newcastle disease. Consequently, the US did not import live poultry (chickens or turkey) or poultry meat or eggs from Germany in 2002 or Jan-Feb 2003. However, 1,650 other live birds were imported into the US from Germany in 2002 (Table 3). All live poultry and other bird species imported into the US (except from Canada) are required to have a USDA issued import permit, a health certificate issued by a government veterinarian in the country of origin, and be quarantined for 30 days in a USDA animal import quarantine facility. Testing for communicable diseases of poultry is completed during the quarantine. This includes pet birds as well as commercial birds.

Table 3: US Imports of live birds and poultry products from Germany, 2002 and Jan-Feb 2003

Product

2002

2003 (Jan-Feb)

Value

(million US$)

Quantity (kg)

Value

(million US$)

Quantity (kg)

Birds, live, nesoi (106390000) (no)

0.013

1,650

0

0

Down, not further worked than cleaned, disinfected, or treated for preservation (05059100065)

1.526

85,601

0.195

53,608

Feathers, not further worked than cleaned, disinfected, or treated for preservation (0505100060)

0.752

296,916

0.113

8,877

Source: World Trade Atlas

Germany exports a significant amount of live chickens, geese and turkeys and poultry eggs , poultry meat, and poultry liver (Table 2). Because, presumably, most of these exports go to other EU countries, and because movement of animals and animal products between member countries of the EU is very open, it is possible that some of these products may be re-exported to the US from other EU countries. Table 4 shows US imports from all EU countries during 2002. Also listed in the table are the countries of origin for the majority of each imported product. Belgium is the primary country of origin for live birds coming into the US from the EU, while France is the primary EU supplier of hatching eggs, poultry meat, and poultry livers and offal.


Table 4: US imports from the EU, 2002

Product

2002

Quantity

( head or kg.)

Value

(million US$)

Primary Country of Origin

Birds, live, nesoi (0106390000 & 0106001000) (head)

41,324

0.531

Belgium

Live psittaciformes (incl. parrots, parakeets, macaws, cockatoos) (0106320000) (head)

1,054

0.032

Live birds of prey (0106310000) (head)

7

0.002

Bird eggs, in shell, for hatching (0407000020) (kg)

120,775

1.644

France, UK

Meat of poultry and edible meat offal, salted, in brine, dried, or smoked, including edible flours and malts of poultry meat or offal (0210992000 and 0210902000) (kg)

180

0.003

France

Livers from ducks, geese, guinea fowl, fresh, chilled, or frozen (0207360020, 0207340000) (kg)

356,097

1.617

Livers from geese, prepared or preserved (1602202000) (kg)

20,855

0.35

Offals (not liver) from ducks, geese, guinea fowl, fresh, chilled, or frozen (0207360040, 0207350000) (kg)

36,567

0.075

Meat from ducks, geese, guineas, fresh, chilled, or frozen (0207330000, 0207320000)

600

0.019

Source: World Trade Atlas

Canadian and Mexican imports from Germany are worth noting because of their proximity to the US. Both countries imported substantial numbers of live birds from Germany in 2002 (Table 5). Neither country imported poultry meat from Germany in 2002.

Table 5: Live Bird Imports to Canada and Mexico from Germany, 2002 and Jan-Feb 2003

Product

2002

Jan-Feb 2003

Quantity

(head or kg)

$Value (million US)

Quantity

(head)

$Value (million US)

Canadian Imports from Germany

Poultry, live, breeding stock, weighing not over 185G each (01051)

51,514

0.289

12,754

0.289

Pet or song birds, live (0106390010)

8,793

0.092

0

0

Live birds, nes (0106390090)

122

0.040

0

0

Live psittaciformes (incl. parrots, parakeets, macaws, cockatoos) (0106320000)

888

0.010

0

0

Mexican Imports from Germany

Chickens, live, breeding stock, weighing not over 185G each (01051)

149,840

0.640

0

0

Bird egg+shell (040700)

10,450 kg.

0.166

0

0

Source: World Trade Atlas

What is the level of passenger traffic arriving in the United States from Germany?

In fiscal year 2000, a total of 3,585,742 passengers arrived in the US from Germany on direct flights. However, many of those were transit passengers, as only about 1,786,045 arrivals in the US reported Germany as their country of residency.

As part of USDA, PPQ’s Agricultural Quarantine Inspection Monitoring system, 5,667 air passengers arriving in the US from Germany in fiscal year 2002 were sampled for items of agriculture interest. Of these passengers, one was found to be carrying 0.5 kg of turkey. This passenger did not have plans to visit or work on a ranch or farm while in the US.

Source: US Dept. of Transportation; US Dept. of Commerce; USDA, PPQ

Are there any political/trade issues between the US and Germany?

Germany is a member of the European Union (EU) and is thereby a party to several ongoing agriculture related trade issues between the US and the EU. The areas of ongoing disputes include the EU bans on imports of biotechnology products, beef from cattle treated with growth promoting hormones, and poultry meat treated with low-concentration chlorine as an antimicrobial treatment.

(Note: Sources of political/trade information can be limited. There may be political/trade issues that were not identified.)

Source: USTR, 2002 National Trade Estimate Report on Foreign Trade Barriers

CEI’s plans for follow up: CEI does not intend to produce any follow-up reports regarding HPAI in Germany. If you need more information or would like to comment on this worksheet, you may reply to this message or contact Judy Akkina at (970) 494-7324 .

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