CT_Hpaiegypt02232006bb

Avian Influenza_ Egypt_ 2_22_2006

Avian Influenza , Egypt
February 22, 2006
Impact Worksheet

Summary: Outbreaks of avian influenza (AI) virus subtype H5N1 have been reported in eleven governorates in Egypt since its first case was reported February 17, 2006, at Shibin el-Kanatir in the Nile Delta, 60 km north of Cairo. The governorates reporting outbreaks are: Cairo, Giza, Beni Suef, Qina, Dakahlia, Kalyubeya, Behera, Kafr el Sheikh, Menia, Sharkeya and Menufeya. The outbreaks involve commercial and backyard poultry. This is the first reported case of highly pathogenic avian influenza in Egypt since 1965.

In 2005, Egypt’s poultry stocks totaled slightly more than 115 million chickens, ducks, geese and turkeys, amounting to less than 1% of the world poultry stocks. Geese stocks, Egypt’s largest poultry component, totaled 9,100 million, representing 3% of the 2005 world geese production. As a share of the world’s total production in 2005, Egypt produced 664,240 metric tons of poultry meat, amounting to less than 1% of world poultry meat production, and 240,000 metric tons of hen eggs, amounting to 4.05% of world production of hen eggs.

The United States, Canada, and Mexico did not import live poultry, poultry meat, or poultry products of concern, in 2004 or 2005, from Egypt. Following the report of avian influenza virus type H5N1 in Egypt, APHIS, Veterinary Services placed a temporary ban on the U.S. import of poultry and commercial shipments of live birds, hatching eggs, and unprocessed avian products from Egypt . Processed avian products from Egypt must be accompanied by a VS import permit and government certification confirming that the products were treated according to APHIS requirements. U.S.-origin pet birds and performing birds will be allowed to return upon entering one of the three USDA Quarantine centers for 30 days.

How extensive is avian influenza in Egypt , and what was Egypt ’s disease status prior to the outbreak?

The first confirmation of H5N1 was February 17, 2006 , and was reported to OIE on February 18. Seven outbreaks of avian influenza (AI) virus subtype H5N1 were reported in seven governorates in Egypt (Cairo, Giza, Menia, Qina, Kalyubeya, Behera, and Dakahlia), and were diagnosed by the Animal Health Research Institute (Egypt’s national laboratory) and confirmed by The United States Naval Medical Research Unit No. 3 (NAMRU-3), Cairo, as H5N1. On February 20, outbreaks were reported in 4 additional governorates: Beni Suef, Kafr el Sheikh, Sharkeya, and Menufeya. These 11 governorates are concentrated in the Nile Delta and Upper Egypt .

Preliminary estimates of birds destroyed include 84,500 chickens from 3 poultry farms, approximately 1,200 birds from villages, 4,000 birds in Behera (unknown if domestic or commercial) and 563 birds from the Giza Zoo. More definitive information regarding numbers of birds affected, number of cases/deaths, and birds destroyed, as well as breakdowns of

commercial versus backyard birds, is expected in future OIE Reports. The source of the outbreaks has yet to be determined. Control measures include quarantine of infected areas, disinfection of infected premises, condemnation and sanitary disposal of birds at infected areas. This is the first reported case of highly pathogenic avian influenza in Egypt since 1965.

Outbreaks of the Asian HPAI subtype H5N1 also have occurred recently in domestic poultry in Nigeria (February 2006) and India (February 2006). Outbreaks of this subtype H5N1 occurred in domestic poultry in several European countries during the past 6 months including Russia (July 2005), Kazakhstan (August 2005), Turkey (October 2005) and Romania (October 2005).

Source: OIE Disease Information Report, Egypt State Information Service website www.sis.gov.eg, accessed February 21and 22, 2006

What is Egypt ’s place in the international market for poultry and poultry products?

Egypt produced 95 million chickens in 2005, representing <1% of world chicken stocks and 240,000 metric tons of hen eggs, representing 4% of world hen eggs stocks (Table 1). Duck and turkey stocks in 2005 were 9.1 million and 1.8 million, respectively, each accounting for less than 1% of world stocks. Geese stocks in 2005 were 9.1 million, accounting for 3% of world stocks.

Egypt’s 2005 production of chicken, duck and turkey meat represented less than 1% of world production. Egypt produced 42,210 metric tons of goose meat, representing slightly more than 18% of world goose meat production. Egypt also produced 12,900 metric tons of pigeon meat, representing 64% of world production.

Egypt exported 17,308 million head of poultry, most of which were chickens, in 2004 (Table 2). Egypt’s exports of nearly 17.3 million head of chickens represented 2.2% of world chicken exports. Egypt exported more than 2 million metric tons of hen eggs in 2004, representing 0.2% of world hen egg exports. Poultry meat exports from Egypt in 2004 represented less than 0.1% of world poultry meat exports.

Source: United Nations FAO

Table 1: Poultry Stocks and Production, Egypt , 2004 and 2005

Stocks

2004

2005

Stocks

(1000 head)

Stocks

(1000 head)

% of

World Stocks

Poultry, Total

115,150

115,150

<1%

Chickens

95,000

95,000

<1%

Ducks

9,200

9,200

<1%

Geese

9,100

9,100

3%

Turkeys

1,850

1,850

<1%

Production

Production

(Metric Tons)

Production

(Metric Tons)

% of World Production

Poultry Meat, Total

664,240

664,240

0.82%

Chicken Meat

559,500

559,500

0.80%

Duck Meat

39,130

39,130

1.13%

Goose Meat

42,210

42,210

18.07%

Turkey Meat

10,500

10,500

0.20%

Meat of Pigeons and other birds

12,900

12,900

64.64%

Eggs, Primary Production

240,000

240,000

0.37%

Hen Eggs

240,000

240,000

4.05%

Table 2: Exports of live poultry and poultry products, Egypt , 2003 and 2004

Exports

2003

2004

% of World

Exports in 2004

Quantity

(1000 head or metric tons)

Value

(1000 $)

Quantity

(1000 head or metric tons)

Value

(1000 $)

Quantity

Value

Live Animals

Chickens

Ducks

Turkeys

Poultry Meat

Poultry Meat

<0.1%

Fresh Poultry Meat

<0.1%

Chicken Meat

<0 .1%

Duck Meat

< 0.1%

Turkey Meat

<0 .1%

Eggs

Hen Eggs

What are the U.S. imports of poultry or poultry products from Egypt

The U.S. did not import any live poultry, poultry meat, eggs, or poultry products of concern from Egypt in 2004 or 2005.

The U.S. does not consider Egypt to be free of Exotic Newcastle Disease; therefore exports of commercial poultry and poultry products to the U.S. are restricted. In addition, f ollowing the report of avian influenza virus type H5N1 in Egypt, APHIS, Veterinary Services placed a temporary ban on the U.S. import of poultry and commercial shipments of live birds, hatching eggs, and unprocessed avian products from Egypt. Processed avian products from Egypt must be accompanied by a VS import permit and government certification confirming that the products were treated according to APHIS requirements. U.S.-origin pet birds and performing birds will be allowed to return upon entering one of the three USDA Quarantine centers for 30 days.

Source: World Trade Atlas

What are the Canadian and Mexican imports of poultry or poultry products from Egypt ?

Canada and Mexico did not import any live poultry, poultry meat, eggs, or poultry products of concern from Egypt in 2004 or 2005.

Source: World Trade Atlas

What is the level of passenger traffic arriving in the United States from Egypt ?

In 2004, 52,247 air passengers arrived from Egypt on direct flights to the U.S. This number does not include passengers arriving from Egypt via indirect flights.

As part of APHIS-PPQ’s agriculture quarantine inspection monitoring, 294 air passengers from Egypt were sampled for items of agricultural interest in fiscal year 2004. Four passengers were found to be carrying relevant items of interest. Relevant items of interest include chicken (2 kg), poultry (1 kg), and unspecified meat (2 kg). None of the air passengers sampled for items of agricultural interest had been on a farm prior to travel or were planning to visit a farm or ranch in the United States.

Source: USDA APHIS-PPQ Agricultural Quarantine Inspection databases, US Department of Commerce.

CEI’s plans for follow up:

At this time, CEI will continue to monitor this situation, but has no plans to issue additional reports. If you need more information or if you want to comment on this worksheet, you may reply to this message, or contact Barbara Bischoff at (970) 494-7282 .

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