CT_Csf_romania0401

Classical Swine Fever_ Romania

CEI LogoClassical Swine Fever, Romania

Impact Worksheet, April 6, 2001


Summary: Romania reported to the OIE on April 3, 2001 an outbreak of classical swine fever (CSF) in central Romania, Harghita district. Fourteen swine were infected in a herd of 552, with seven deaths. Origin of the infection was unknown, and mode of spread was from sow to piglets. Although the USDA did not recognize Romania as free of CSF, the last reported outbreak occurred in 1974. Romania has maintained a general policy of vaccinating against CSF, however, none of the 14 infected swine (one sow, and 13 piglets under vaccination age) were vaccinated. Romanian authorities have reportedly implemented a range of control measures. The US imported no live swine and no fresh, frozen, or preserved pork products from Romania in 1999, 2000, or January 2001. Romania produces and trades less than one percent of world production and trade in swine and pig meat.

USDA, APHIS, VS/NCIE; OIE Press Release, 4 April 2001; OIE Animal Disease Report, 6 April 2001

CSF Romania

How extensive is the situation in Romania, and what was the country’s disease status prior to the outbreak?

Romanian authorities reported to the OIE on April 3, 2001 an outbreak of classical swine fever (CSF) in Harghita district. The outbreak occurred in a herd of 552 swine. Although the USDA did not recognize Romania as free of CSF, the last reported outbreak occurred in 1974. Romania has maintained a policy of vaccinating against CSF. In the current outbreak, 14 cases were reported including one unvaccinated sow and 13 piglets under the age of vaccination; seven infected animals had died. Origin of the infection was unknown.

Control measures reported include slaughter of infected animals, quarantine, establishment of a surveillance zone, animal movement control, compulsory vaccination of all pig herds, and control of wildlife reservoirs.

The Veterinary Services of Romania are reportedly well-structured and have a clear strategic program. However, a lack of resources results in plans that are not fully complied with or implemented. Shortcomings have also been noted in laboratory practices.

Sources: OIE; European Commission

What is the country’s production and trade in affected animals and animal products?

Romania’s stock of almost 6 million live swine in 2000 accounted for less than one percent of world stocks, and pig meat production was also less than one percent of world production. Romania accounted for very small quantities--0.4 percent, or less--of 1999 world trade in live swine and pig meat (Table 1). No data were available to identify Romania’s trade partners for swine and their products.

Table 1: Production and trade in swine and pig meat, Romania,
2000 (Production) and 1999 (Trade)

Romania

% of World

Swine Production

Live stocks (# head)

5,950,600

0.6

Slaughtered (# head)

8,400,000

0.7

Pig meat (mt)

626,000

0.7

Trade in Animals

Live swine imports (# head)

3,800

0.02

Live swine exports (# head)

150

Trade in Products

Pig meat imports (mt)

27,740

0.4

Pig meat exports (mt)

3,303

0.1

Source: UN Food and Agriculture Organization

What are the US imports of affected animals or animal products from Romania?

The US imported no live swine and no fresh, frozen, or preserved pork products from Romania in 1999, 2000, or January 2001.

Source : World Trade Atlas

What is the level of passenger traffic arriving in the United States from the affected country?

Very few (155) direct flights from Romania arrived to the US in fiscal year 2000; those flights carried a total of about 30,000 passengers. This does not represent all passengers originating in Romania and arriving in the US.

As part of APHIS-PPQ’s Agriculture Quarantine Inspection Monitoring, 234 air passengers from Romania were sampled for items of agricultural interest during fiscal 1999. Twenty-five (25) of these passengers were found to be carrying a total of 43 kg of pork or unspecified meat items. None of these 25 reported plans to visit or work on a farm or ranch while in the US.

Source: US Dept of Transportation; US Dept of Commerce; APHIS-PPQ (Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service - Plant Protection and Quarantine) Agricultural Quarantine Inspection Monitoring data base

CEI’s plans for follow up:

As needed, CEI will provide further information regarding consequences of this outbreak. No further action is planned as of 6 April. If you seek more information or wish to comment on this worksheet, contact Chris Kopral (970-490-7819) or David Cummings (970-490-7895).

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