CT_Wsdbrazil012105

White Spot Disease_ Brazil_ 1_27_2005

White Spot Disease, Brazil
January 27, 2005
Impact Worksheet




Summary: On January 20, 2005 Brazil reported infection of cultivated Pacific white shrimp ( Penaeus vannamei) with white spot virus (WSV). This is the first reported occurrence of WSV in Brazil . White spot virus, also known as white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), causes a highly infectious disease of Penaeus spp. cultivated shrimp. Natural infection also occurs in other crustaceans including crabs, crawfish and lobsters.

Brazil shrimp production (wild catch and farmed) has been growing rapidly over the last few years; annual production of shrimp and prawns amounted to over 2 percent of the world production in 2002. Brazil exported 63,844 metric tons of shrimp valued at $244 million in 2003. About 98 percent of Brazil ’s shrimp exports were to the European Union and the US .

The US imported 8,909 metric tons of shrimp from Brazil in 2004, 59 percent less than the 21,798 metric tons imported in 2003. The US also imported large quantities of rock lobster, and smaller amounts of crab and other crustaceans. US imports of crustacean products from Brazil were cooked; cooking is an effective means of inactivating WSV.

How extensive is white spot disease in Brazil , and what was Brazil ’s disease status prior to the outbreak?

On January 20, 2005, Brazil reported infection of Pacific white shrimp ( Penaeus vannamei) with white spot virus (WSV). This is the first reported occurrence of WSV in Brazil . The shrimp were raised in a marine-farmed setting. The disease outbreak reportedly began on December 10, 2004 in Santa Catarina.


White spot virus, also known as white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), causes a highly infectious disease of Penaeus spp. cultivated shrimp. Natural infection also occurs in other crustaceans including crabs, crayfish and lobsters. Information about WSV can be found at www.oie.int/fdc/eng/en_diseasecard.htm.

Source: OIE Disease Information Report, OIE Disease Technical Cards

What is Brazil ’s place in the international market for crustaceans and crustacean products?

Brazil shrimp production (wild catch and farmed) has been growing rapidly over the last few years; annual production of shrimp and prawn amounted to over 2 percent of the world production in 2002 (Table 1).

Brazil exported 63,844 metric tons of shrimp valued at $244 million in 2003, approximately 60 percent of its annual cultivated shrimp production (Table 2). About 98 percent of Brazil ’s shrimp exports were to the European Union and the US .

Over 20 percent of world exports of rock lobster and sea crawfish ( Palinurus spp., Panulirus spp., Jasus spp.) came from Brazil in 2003 (Table 2). Brazil exported smaller amounts of crab, lobster ( Homarus spp.) and other crustaceans.

Table 1. Crustacean production, Brazil , 2001 - 2002

2001

2002

Production

(metric tons)

Production

(metric tons)

% of world production

Shrimp, prawns

67,971

88,109

2.1 %

Rock lobster and other sea crawfish ( Palinurus spp.)

7,135

7,016

3.2%

Crabs

13,597

14,100

1.1%

Crustaceans, misc.*

5,412

4,290

< 1%

*Includes freshwater crustaceans and miscellaneous marine crustaceans.

Source: United Nations FAO


Table 2. Exports of live crustaceans and crustacean products, Brazil, 2002 – 2003

Exports

2002

2003

% of world, 2003

Quantity

(metric tons)

Value

(1000 $)

Quantity

(metric tons)

Value

(1000 $)

Value

(1000 $)

Shrimp, prawns, cooked, frozen

39,960

174,939

60,844

244,542

5.3 %

Shrimp, prawns, live, fresh, chilled, dried, salted, or in brine, or cooked, not frozen

16

76

3

18

< 1 %

Rock lobster and other sea crawfish ( Palinurus spp. and others), cooked, frozen

2,767

70,978

2,415

65,324

20.8 %

Lobster ( Homarus spp.), cooked, frozen

0

0

64

218

< 1 %

Crabs, including in shell, cooked, frozen

1,158

1,700

1,469

2,398

< 1 %

Crustaceans, misc., cooked, frozen

45

161

84

942

< 1 %

Source: World Trade Atlas

What are the US imports of crustaceans and crustacean products from Brazil ?

The US imported 8,909 metric tons of shrimp from Brazil in 2004, 59 percent less than the 21,798 metric tons imported in 2003 (Table 3). The US imported just over 2,500 metric tons of rock lobster and sea crawfish in 2004. Other crustacean products imported into the US from Brazil include lobster and crab. US imports of crustacean products from Brazil were cooked; cooking is an effective means of inactivating WSV.


Table 3. US imports of crustacean and crustacean products from Brazil , 2003 – November 2004

Product

2003

2004 (Jan-Nov)

Value

(1000 $)

Quantity (metric ton)

Value

(1000 $)

Quantity

(metric ton)

Shrimp, prawns, cooked, frozen (030613)

96,780

21,798

39,393

8,909

Shrimp, prawns, shell-on, live, fresh, chilled, dried, salted, or in brine, or cooked, not frozen (030623)

2.2

0.5

0

0

Rock lobster and other sea crawfish ( Palinurus spp. and others), cooked, frozen (030611)

70,207

2,967

71,980

2,510

Lobster ( Homarus spp.), cooked, frozen (030612)

403

15

73

4

Crabs, including in shell, cooked, frozen (030614)

398

69

935

72

Source: World Trade Atlas

What are Canada and Mexico ’s imports of crustacean or crustacean products from Brazil ?

Canada imported 89 metric tons of Brazilian crustacean products valued at $1.5 million (Canadian dollars) during January-November 2004. Imported products included rock lobster, shrimp and prawns and most were cooked.

Mexico imported no crustaceans in 2004, but imported 473 metric tons of shrimp and prawns in 2003, valued at $2.1 million.

Source: World Trade Atlas

What is the level of passenger traffic arriving in the United States from Brazil ?

In 2003, a total of 348,945 international air passenger arrivals in the US reported Brazil as their country of residency. As part of USDA, APHIS-PPQ’s Agricultural Quarantine Inspection Monitoring system, 2,333 air passengers arriving in the US from Brazil in fiscal year 2003 were sampled for items of agriculture interest. A total of 149 potential agricultural risk items were identified; of these, no seafood or aquaculture items were found.

Source: Office of Travel & Tourism Industries, US Department of Commerce, USDA APHIS-PPQ Agricultural Quarantine Inspection databases, Bureau of Transportation Statistics.

CEI’s plans for follow up:

If you need more information or if you want to comment on this worksheet, you may reply to this message, or contact Liz Williams (970-494-7329) or Kathy Orloski (970-494-7221) .

Complementary Content
${loading}