CT_Hpairussiakaz08042005

Avian Influenza_ Russia and Kazakhstan_ 8_4_2005

Avian influenza,
Russia
and Kazakhstan ,
August 4, 2005
Impact Worksheet



Summary:
On July 24, 2005, an outbreak of avian influenza, subtype H5N1, was reported in nine villages in the Novosibirsk region of southern Russia . Affected poultry populations include backyard turkeys, ducks, geese, and chickens. The pathogenicity is unknown, although reported mortality ranges from 1 to 2 percent. There is no evidence of avian influenza in nearby commercial poultry operations. On July 22, 2005, an outbreak of avian influenza, subtype H5 was detected in the Pavlodar region of Kazakhstan and was reported to OIE on August 2. A total of 2,800 birds, primarily geese, are housed on the affected premises in Kazakhstan . Although these two outbreaks have occurred in relatively close proximity to each other, there is no evidence at this time that the outbreaks are epidemiologically linked.

In 2004, Russia ’s poultry stocks amounted to 335 million chickens, geese, turkeys and ducks. Chickens comprised the majority of Russia ’s poultry stocks. Russia produced about 2 million metric tons of eggs in 2004. As a share of the world’s total production, Russia produced only 1.5% of chicken meat production and 3.4% of egg production. In 2004, Kazakhstan poultry stocks amounted to about 24 million chickens and turkeys, which was less than 0.2% of the world production. Chickens comprised the majority of Kazakhstan ’s stock.

Between January 2004 and May 2005, the US imported 20,183 live birds from Russia . Live birds are quarantined in US ports prior to clearance for entry into the country, during which time testing for infectious diseases, including avian influenza, takes place. The US did not import any poultry, poultry products or birds from Kazakhstan between January 2004 and May 2005.

How extensive is highly pathogenic avian influenza(HPAI) in Russia and Kazakhstan , and what was the status of HPAI in these countries prior to the outbreak?

On July 24, 2005, an outbreak of avian influenza, subtype H5N1, was reported on private farms in nine villages in the Novosibirsk region of southern Russia . The outbreak was first detected on July 18, 2005. By August 2, 2005, the virus spread to the regions of Altai and Tyumen and includes 14 villages. The pathogenicity is unknown, although reported mortality ranges from 1 to 2 percent. Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) has not been reported in Russia previously.

Affected poultry populations include backyard turkeys, ducks, geese, and chickens. There is no evidence of avian influenza in nearby commercial poultry operations.

Control measures underway include depopulation, premises disinfection, quarantine, and movement restrictions. Official reports describe the outbreak source as wild waterfowl; however, unofficial reports raise the possibility of smuggled poultry products from China , as a consequence of high meat prices in Russia .

On July 22, 2005, an outbreak of avian influenza, subtype H5 was detected in the Pavlodar region of Kazakhstan and was reported to OIE on August 2. A total of 2,800 birds, primarily geese, are housed on the affected premises. Control measures implemented include depopulation, premises disinfection, quarantine, and movement restrictions. Although the avian influenza outbreaks in Russia and Kazakhstan have occurred in relatively close proximity to each other, there is no evidence that these outbreaks are epidemiologically linked.

Source: OIE Disease Information Report

What is Russia ’s and Kazakhstan ’s place in the international market for poultry and poultry products?

In 2004, Russia ’s poultry stocks amounted to almost 335 million chickens, geese, turkeys and ducks and comprised 1.9% of world stocks (Table 1a). Chickens, totaling over 328 million head in 2004, comprised the majority of Russia ’s poultry stocks, followed by geese, turkeys and ducks. Russia produced about 2 million metric tons of eggs in 2004. As a share of the world’s total production, Russia produced 1.5% of chicken meat production and 3.4% of egg production.

Kazakhstan poultry stocks totaled 24,700 live chickens and turkeys in 2004, less than 0.2% of the world’s production (Table1b). Chickens comprised the majority of Kazakhstan ’s poultry stocks. Kazakhstan egg production at 129,792 metric tons, was 0.2% of world production. Chicken meat production was less than 0.1% of world production.

Table 1a: Poultry stocks and production, Russia , 2003 and 2004

2003

2004

Stocks

(1,000 head)

Stocks

(1,000 head)

% of World Production

Chickens

337,027

328,501

2.0%

Geese

2,950

2,950

1.0%

Turkeys

2,500

2,500

0.9%

Ducks

573

573

<.1%

Production

(metric tons)

Production

(metric tons)

% of World

Production

Eggs

2,052,000

2,005,600

3.4%

Chicken Meat

1,030,422

1,030,000

1.5%

Table 1b: Poultry stocks and production, Kazakhstan , 2003 and 2004

2003

2004

Stocks

(1,000 head)

Stocks

(1,000 head)

% of World Production

Chickens

23,600

24,700

<0.2%

Turkeys

191

50

<0.1%

Production

(metric tons)

Production

(metric tons)

% of World

Production

Eggs

127,659

129,792

0.2%

Chicken Meat

36,000

37,000

<0.1%

During 2003, Russia exported 928,000 live chickens valued at $454,000 (Table 2a). By quantity, the live chicken exports were 0.1% of world live chicken exports; however, by value, Russia ’s share of world live chicken exports were less than 0.1%. Russia also exported chicken (canned and not canned), turkey, and duck meat as well as duck offal products. Combined, these exports amounted to less than 0.1% of world exports, by both quantity and value (Table 2a). Russia also exported almost 8,000 metric tons of eggs valued at over $5.7 million and 189 metric tons of dried eggs valued at $379,000. Eggs, valued at almost $6 million, were Russia ’s largest poultry product export, amounting to 0.5% of world exports by value.

Kazakhstan only exported poultry products, not live poultry, in 2003 (Table 2b). Chicken and duck meat exports, totaling 85 metric tons in 2003, were worth about $69,000 and only comprised less than 0.1% of the world market in quantity and value. Kazakhstan exported 44,000 metric tons of eggs, worth about $18,000 in 2003.

Table 2a: Exports of live poultry and poultry products, Russia , 2002 - 2003

Exports

2002

2003

% of World in 2003

Quantity

(# head or mt)

Value

(1000 $)

Quantity

(# head or mt)

Value

(1000 $)

Quantity

(# head or mt)

Value

(1000 $)

Live Birds (1,000 head)

Chickens

1393

605

928

454

0.1%

<0.1%

Fresh or Frozen Meat, Offal, and Eggs (mt)

Chicken meat, not canned

987

1062

560

471

<0.1%

<0.1%

Chicken meat, canned

158

269

216

409

<0.1%

<0.1%

Turkey meat

47

45

36

19

<0.1%

<0.1%

Duck meat

4

8

14

17

<0.1%

<0.1%

Offal of duck

0

1

1

4

<0.1%

<0.1%

Eggs

6,965

4,993

7,904

5,677

0.8%

0.5%

Eggs, dry whole yolks

87

168

189

379

0.6%

0.3%

Table 2b: Exports of poultry products, Kazakhstan , 2002 - 2003

Exports

2002

2003

% of World in 2003

Quantity

(mt)

Value

(1000 $)

Quantity

(mt)

Value

(1000 $)

Quantity

(mt)

Value

(1000 $)

Fresh or Frozen Meat, Offal, and Eggs

Chicken meat, not canned

30

22

81

65

<0.1%

<0.1%

Duck meat

0

0

4

4

<0.1%

<0.1%

Eggs, hen

94

69

41

14

<0.1%

<0.1%

Eggs, dry whole yolks

17

47

3

4

<0.1%

<0.1%

Source: United Nations FAO

What are the US imports of poultry or poultry products from Russia and Kazakhstan ?

Between January 2004 and May 2005, the US imported 20,183 live pet and commercial birds and 4,248 kilograms of clean and disinfected feathers from Russia (Table 3). Live birds are quarantined in US ports prior to clearance for entry into the country, during which time testing for infectious diseases, including avian influenza, takes place. Cleaned and disinfected feathers would not be at risk of HPAI transmission.

The US did not import any poultry, poultry products or birds from Kazakhstan between January 2004 and May 2005.

Table 3: US imports of live birds and poultry products from Russia , 2004 – May 2005

Product

2004

2005 (January - May)

Value

($)

Quantity

(number or kg)

Value

($)

Quantity

(number or kg)

Birds, Live pet & Commercial (number)

158,000

20,183

28,000

6,104

Feathers of down, stuffing, clean (kg)

507,000

4,248

238,000

5,797

Source: World Trade Atlas

What are Canada and Mexico ’s imports of live birds or poultry products from Russia and Kazakhstan ?

In 2004, Canada imported 821 live pet or song birds and 12,245 kilograms of clean and disinfected feathers from Russia . In the first five months of 2005, Canada imported 647 live pet or song birds. No feathers were imported in the first five months of 2005. Cleaned and disinfected feathers would not be at risk for transmission of HPAI.

Mexico did not import any poultry, poultry products or birds from Russia in 2004 – April 2005.

What is the level of passenger traffic arriving in the United States from Russia and Kazakhstan ?

In 2004, 72,419 Russian residents arrived on flights to the US . As part of APHIS-PPQ’s agriculture quarantine inspection monitoring, 792 air passengers from Russia were sampled for items of agricultural interest in fiscal year 2004. No passengers were found to be carrying poultry items of interest.

In 2004, 3,784 Kazakhstan residents arrived in the US on airline flights. Of a total of 53 air passengers sampled for items of agricultural interest as a part of APHIS-PPQ’s agricultural quarantine inspections monitoring, none were found to have poultry items of interest.

Source: Office of Travel & Tourism Industries, US Department of Commerce, USDA APHIS-PPQ Agricultural Quarantine Inspection databases, Bureau of Transportation Statistics.

CEI’s plans for follow up:

For more information or to comment on this worksheet, you may reply to this message, or contact Kathy Orloski at (970) 494-7221 or Elizabeth Williams at (970) 494-7329.

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