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CSF_ Spain 6_19_01

CEI LogoClassical Swine Fever, Spain

Impact Worksheet, June 19, 2001


Summary: Spain reported to the OIE on June 14, 2001 an outbreak of classical swine fever (CSF) on a farm located in Soses in the Catalonia region of northeastern Spain. The last reported outbreak of CSF in Spain was in July 1998. The USDA does not consider Spain to be free of CSF. Slaughter of animals on affected premises as well as on adjacent premises, and movement restrictions of live swine, embryos, and semen are being used to control this outbreak. Spain’s total swine production, number of head slaughtered, and pig meat production are approximately three percent of the world’s production. Spain accounted for approximately six percent of the world’s trade in live swine in 1999, and approximately five percent of the world’s trade in pig meat. The US did not import any live swine or fresh or frozen swine products from Spain in 1999 and 2000. However, a small number of hams were imported into the US in 1998 and 1999. During fiscal year 2000, 190 of 2631 air passengers from Spain sampled by PPQ were found to be carrying various types of pork products.

How extensive is the situation in the affected country and what was the country’s disease status prior to the outbreak?

On June 14, 2001, Spain reported to the OIE an outbreak of classical swine fever (CSF). Spain's last reported outbreak of CSF was in July 1998. The USDA does not consider Spain to be free of CSF.

The current outbreak was first identified on a farm in Soses (marked by a blue triangle on the map), in the Catalonia region of northeastern Spain. This farm had 2035 fattening hogs. To date, a total of four premises have been affected, three in the Catalonia region and one in Valencia (location of Valencia premises marked by brown square on map). All pigs on affected premises have been, or will be, destroyed, reportedly totaling over 10,000 animals thus far. Pigs on premises within 1 kilometer of affected farms are planned to be destroyed to control spread of the disease. In addition, movement controls have been put in place for live swine, embryos, and semen. Investigations are still underway regarding the source of infection.

The European Commission banned live pig and porcine semen, ova, and embryo exports from the Catalonia region of Spain on June 14, 2001. This ban would be in effect until June 30, 2001. At a special meeting of the EU's Standing Veterinary Committee on June 22, the situation will be reviewed.

CSF Spain
Source: OIE Disease Information Report, FAS , Reuters News, El Pais, Agworldwide News

What is Spain’s production and trade in affected animals and animal products?

Spain’s stock of almost 24 million live swine in 2000 accounted for less than three percent of world stocks. The number of head that were slaughtered was approximately three percent of the world’s production, and pig meat production was approximately three percent of the world’s production. Spain accounted for approximately six percent of the world’s exports in live swine in 1999, and approximately five percent of the world’s exports in pig meat (Table 1). The vast majority of Spain's exports of live swine and pig meat stay within the EU.

Table 1: Production and trade in swine and pig meat, Spain,

2000 (Production) and 1999 (Trade)

Spain

% of World

Swine Production

Live stocks (# head)

23,682,000

2.6

Slaughtered (# head)

36,525,000

3.1

Pig meat (mt)

2,962,000

3.2

Trade in Animals

Live swine exports (# head)

949,329

Trade in Products

Pig meat exports (mt)

358,401

5.1

Source: UN Food and Agriculture Organization, FAS

What are the US imports of affected animals or animal products from Spain?

The US imported no live swine and no fresh or frozen swine products from Spain in 1999, 2000, or 2001 (January to March). The US did import a small number of hams and cuts of ham valued at $2.2 million in year 2000 and $1.0 million dollars in 1999. The US also imported a small number of swine hides and skins from Spain in 1998 and 1999 at a combined value of $25,000.

Source : World Trade Atlas

What is the level of passenger traffic arriving in the United States from the affected country?

A total of 771,983 passengers arrived in the US on approximately 4800 direct flights from Spain in fiscal year 2000. This number does not include passengers who arrived in the US from Spain via indirect flights.

As part of APHIS-PPQ’s agriculture quarantine inspection monitoring, 2631 air passengers from Spain were sampled for items of agricultural interest in fiscal year 2000. Of these passengers, 190 were carrying a total of 178 kg of pork items, such as pork, chorizo, ham, salami, etc., that could potentially harbor the CSF virus. This does not include meat items that were not specified as being of swine origin. All states within the US were reported as destinations of these passengers, including the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. None of the passengers with pork items reported plans to visit or work on a ranch or farm while in the US.

Source: US Department of Transportation, and APHIS-PPQ Agricultural Quarantine Inspection data base

CEI’s plans for follow up:

CEI has no plans for further activity regarding CSF in Spain at this point in time. If you seek more information or wish to comment on this worksheet, please reply to this message or contact Vicki Bridges at (970) 490-7822 or Reg Johnson at (970) 490-7896.



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