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CEI Logo Classical Swine Fever in the Republic of Korea

Impact Worksheet, April 22, 2002


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Summary:

On April 18, 2002 an outbreak of classical swine fever (CSF) in the Cheolwon county, Gangwon Province, Republic of Korea (ROK) was reported to the OIE. CSF has not been reported since 1999 in the ROK. The ROK has pursued a CSF eradication program since 1997. Quarantine measures including restriction of movement, disinfection of surrounding areas, depopulation and burial of all swine on the infected farm are being pursued according to Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry (MAF) procedures. At this time, the source of the infection is not known.

The ROK had approximately one percent of world stocks and one percent of world swine production in 2001. They are a minimal exporter of live pigs and pig meat, primarily to Russia, the Philippines, and Hong Kong. The USDA does not recognize the Republic of Korea as free of CSF or foot and mouth disease; therefore, t he US imported no relevant live animals or animal products from the ROK during 2000, 2001, or January and February of 2002.

The US is a leading trading partner with the ROK importing advanced electronic components, telecommunications equipment, automobiles, steel and other mid-grade quality consumer electronics. The upcoming World Cup Soccer (football) tournament in May and June is expected to focus attention on the issue of reunification with the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

CSF Korea

How extensive is the situation in the affected country and what was the country’s disease status prior to the outbreak?

An outbreak of CSF was reported to the OIE on April 18, 2002. The outbreak was in the Gimwha sub-county, Cheolwon county, Gangwon province Republic of Korea. The site of the outbreak is in the northern part of the country near the demilitarized zone (see flag on map). A representative of the National Veterinary Research and Quarantine Service (NVRQS) visited the farm on April 17 and CSF was confirmed that day through clinical, post-mortem and laboratory diagnosis.

As of April 22, only one site had been confirmed as being infected and the source of the infection was not known. The ROK MAF is now conducting a trace-back survey on the movement of swine and visitors to the farm. Movement restrictions are in place for a 10 km radius of the infected site and will continue for 40 days within 3 km of the infected site.

The ROK has been pursuing a CSF eradication program since 1997, and the last reported case of CSF in the ROK was in August 1999. Vaccinations were suspended in Gangwon province in January 2001, and nationwide vaccinations were suspended in December 2001. The USDA does not recognize the Republic of Korea as free of CSF or foot and mouth disease.

Source: OIE Disease Information Report; Press Release, April 18, 2002, ROK Animal Health Division/MAF

What is the Republic of Korea’s production and trade in affected animals and animal products?

The Republic of Korea had 8.7 million hogs and produced just under 1 million metric tons of pig meat in 2001 (table 1). Both of these amounts were approximately 1 percent of world stocks or production. Very small quantities of live pigs and pig meat were exported by the Republic of Korea in 1999 and 2000 (table 2). Prior to Korea’s foot and mouth disease outbreak in 2000, Japan was their major market for pork exports, primarily fresh pork. Currently, pork export markets are mainly limited to Russia, the Philippines, and Hong Kong.

Table 1: Production in swine and pig meat, Republic of Korea, 2000 and 2001

Swine Production

2000

2001

production

production

% of world production

Live stocks (# head)

8,214,369

8,719,851

0.9%

Pig meat (mt)

915,899

927,692

1.0%

Source: UN Food and Agriculture Organization

Table 2: Exports of live pigs and pig meat, Republic of Korea, 1999 - 2001

Exports

1999

2000

200 1 (preliminary)

quantity

(# head or mt)

value

(1000 $)

quantity

(# head or mt)

value

(1000 $)

quantity

(# head or mt)

Live pigs

325

338

0

0

n/a

Pig meat

110,605

334,316

29,978

73,825

34,700

Source: UN Food and Agriculture Organization, FAS GAIN Report #KS2005 2/1/2002

What are the US, Canadian, and Mexican imports of affected animals or animal products from the Republic of Korea?

The US imported no relevant live animals or animal products from the Republic of Korea during the years 2000, 2001, or January and February of 2002. Mexico also imported no relevant live animals or animal products from the Republic of Korea during the years 2000 or 2001. Canada imported small amounts of swine meat and meat offal (excluding livers, nes, including mixtures, o/t in cans or glass jars 1602499000). Amounts were 4497 kg in 2001, 1708 kg in 2000, and 1746 kg in 1999. These imports would most likely have been non-commercial shipments of processed product which can be imported without an import permit. Canada does not issue import permits for commercial imports of pork or pork products from ROK since Canada does not recognize the ROK as free of FMD or CSF. In addition, the meat inspection system of the ROK has not been approved by the Canadian government for shipment of meat products to Canada.

Source : World Trade Atlas, CFIA (personal communication)

What is the level of passenger traffic arriving in the United States from the affected country?

A total of 1,158,090 passengers arrived on direct flights to the US from the ROK in 1999 and, as of halfway through 2000, the number of passenger arrivals was on track for being approximately the same as 1999. This number does not include passengers who arrived in the US from the ROK via indirect flights.

As part of APHIS-PPQ’s agriculture quarantine inspection monitoring, 2403 air passengers from the ROK were sampled for items of agricultural interest in fiscal year 2000. Of these passengers, 43 were carrying a total of 54.5 kg of pork or meat items that could potentially harbor the CSF virus. None of the passengers with pork or meat items reported plans to visit or work on a ranch or farm while in the US.

Source: US Department of Transportation, and APHIS-PPQ Agricultural Quarantine Inspection data base

What are CEI’s plans for follow up?

As of 22 April 2002, CEI has no plans for further reporting on CSF in the Republic of Korea. If you seek more information or wish to comment on this worksheet, please reply by e-mail or contact Jennifer Grannis at (970) 490-7844 or Vicki Bridges at (970) 490-7822.



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