Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

Actions
Loading...

HPAI Vietnam_ 01_12_04

Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza, Vietnam
January 12, 2004
Impact Worksheet

Summary: Vietnam reported on January 8, 2004 its first outbreak ever of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). The virus, subtype H5, was detected in parent broiler stock on 3 farms in the southern part of Vietnam. The source of the infection is under investigation.

Vietnam had 163 million chickens and 57 million ducks in 2002, representing 1% and 5.6% of the world’s stocks, respectively. In 2003, the US imported feathers from Vietnam; these items are processed and not a disease transmission risk.

Vietnam is not recognized by the USDA as free from exotic Newcastle disease, which effectively prohibits imports of poultry and poultry products of risk from Vietnam.

How extensive is highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in Vietnam, and what was Vietnam’s disease status prior to the outbreak?

Vietnam reported on January 8, 2004 its first outbreak ever of HPAI. The virus (see map), subtype H5, was detected in parent broiler stock on 3 farms in the southern part of Vietnam. The farms had a total of 70,000 chickens; 40,000 birds died and the remaining 30,000 birds were destroyed. Further control measures include quarantine, movement control, and control of wildlife reservoirs. The source of the infection is under investigation. Unofficial sources report three human deaths due to avian influenza subtype H5 and deaths in ducks and pigs. Vietnam has requested assistance from the United Nations, Food and Agricultural Organization and the World Health Organization.

HPAI has also recently occurred in Japan, South Korea and Taiwan. South Korea reported the first occurrence of HPAI, subtype H5N1, on December 12, 2003 (see Impact Worksheet, December 16, 2003). Affected facilities include two parent stock farms, one for broilers and the second for ducks, with a population of approximately 30,000 animals. Control efforts included depopulation, burial of eggs and manure, quarantine, and screening.

In December, unofficial sources reported the first case of HPAI in Taiwan. The virus was identified as subtype H5N1. Cases were limited to ducks illegally smuggled from China, found on the water offshore of Quemoy Island; there was no apparent spread to commercial poultry operations.

On January 12, 2004, Japan reported its first outbreak of HPAI since 1925. A separate Impact Worksheet will be distributed regarding that outbreak.


Source: OIE Disease Information Report

What is Vietnam’s place in the international market for poultry and poultry products?

Vietnam had 163 million chickens in 2002, representing 1% of the world’s stocks. Vietnam’s stocks of ducks, at 57 million, accounted for 5.6% of world stocks and 2.3% of world duck meat production.

Table 1: Poultry Stocks and Production, Vietnam, 2001 and 2002

2001

2002

Stocks

Stocks

% of World Production

Chickens (hd)

Ducks (hd)

Chicken meat (mt)

Duck meat (mt)

Hen eggs (mt)

Vietnam did not export live poultry (chickens, ducks, geese, turkeys) in 2000-2001. They exported 2,552 and 1,000 metric tons of shell eggs in 2002 and 2001, respectively, as well as 50 metric tons of poultry meat in 2001.

Source: United Nations FAO

What are the US imports of live birds or poultry products from Vietnam?

The US imported no live poultry from Vietnam in 2002 and through October 2003. Vietnam is not recognized by the US as free from exotic Newcastle disease, which effectively prohibits imports of poultry and non-processed poultry products from Vietnam. The most recent pet bird import from Vietnam occurred in April 2002. The pet bird would have been quarantined in the US prior to clearance for entry into the country, during which time testing for infectious diseases takes place.

The US imported feathers (cleaned or treated) from Vietnam in January-October 2003. Feathers which are processed, and therefore not a disease transmission risk, are legally imported products. Trade data indicates small shipments of edible offals arriving in the US during 2002. Since these items should have been prohibited, APHIS is checking to see if these items were miscoded in the trade database.

[ Update - January 27, 2004: A review of trade and customs information found that the frozen offal, which would not be a legal entry, was refused entry at the port and destroyed.]

Table 2: US Imports of poultry products from Vietnam, 2002-Oct 2003

Product

2002

2003 (Jan-Oct)

$value (million)

quantity (kg)

$value (million)

quantity(kg)

Feathers, unspecified* (0505100060)

*Feathers which are processed and therefore not a disease transmission risk are legally imported products.

Source: World Trade Atlas; VS Import Tracking System

What are the Canadian and Mexican imports of poultry products from Vietnam?

Mexico imported no live poultry or poultry products from Vietnam during 2002-2003. Canada imported poultry products, as noted in Table 3 below. Feathers, eggs and egg products which are processed and therefore not a disease transmission risk are legally imported products.


Table 3: Canadian imports of poultry products from Vietnam, 2002-Oct 2003*

Product

2002

2003 (Jan-Oct)

$value (million)

quantity (kg)

$value (million)

quantity(kg)

Down, cleaned, disinfected or preserved (0505100020)

Eggs, bird, in shell, nes**, preserved or cooked (0407009090)

Eggs, bird, not in shell, nes** (0408991090)

*Feathers, eggs and egg products which are processed and therefore not a disease transmission risk are legally imported products.

**nes = not elsewhere specified.

Source: World Trade Atlas

What is the level of passenger traffic arriving in the United States from Vietnam?

There were no direct flights from Vietnam to the US in 1999 (most recent data). In 2002, a total of 12,360 residents of Vietnam entered the US.

As part of APHIS, PPQ’s Agricultural Quarantine Inspection monitoring, a total of 758 air passengers from Vietnam were sampled in fiscal 2002 for items of agricultural interest. Four (4) of those sampled were found to be carrying a total 0.5 kg of eggs. None of the 4 passengers reported plans to visit or work on a farm or ranch while in the US.

Source: US Dept of Transportation; US Department of Commerce; APHIS-PPQ Agricultural Quarantine Inspection data base

CEI’s plans for follow up:

The Center for Emerging Issues has no further plans for follow-up of HPAI in Vietnam. If you need more information or if you want to comment on this worksheet, you may reply to this message, or contact Chris Kopral at (970) 494-7325 or Kathy Orloski at (970) 494-7221.



Additional Information