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Suspected Foot and Mouth Disease in South Korea

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Suspected Foot and Mouth Disease, South Korea, March 2000

Impact Worksheet

Summary: The Republic of Korea (South Korea) Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries notified the OIE on March 27, 2000 of a suspected outbreak of FMD in the city of Paju in Kyonggi-do province, approximately 20 km northeast of Seoul and 10 km from the North Korean border. FMD virus type O is suspected following initial testing. On March 30th, the Korean government reported the outbreak as contained, having not found the disease in any other animals within a 20 kilometer radius of Paju. To protect US agricultural interests, USDA, APHIS, VS, NCIE issued an interim rule, effective March 29, 2000, prohibiting the importation of FMD-susceptible animals and derived products from South Korea. No further actions are recommended at this time.

The last outbreak of FMD in South Korea occurred in 1934. Prior to this occurrence, the USDA recognized South Korea as free of FMD, although South Korea fell into a special category because South Korea may import animals or meat from countries that are not recognized as free of FMD. USDA did not, however, recognize South Korea as free of major swine diseases such as classical swine fever and swine vesicular disease.

South Korea has relatively minor numbers of livestock and on the world scale is a minor producer and trader of beef, pork, and ovine meat. Reports indicate that the Kyonggi-do province specializes in dairy farming. Pork production also takes place in the Kyonggi-do province.

No live bovine, swine, or ovine, or meat from these animals, were imported into the U.S. from South Korea during 1999 and January 2000. The US did import small quantities of several other animal products (dairy, animal feed, and hides and skins) from South Korea in 1999 and early 2000.

On March 29th, USDA, APHIS, VS, NCIE issued an interium rule prohibiting the imports of FMD-susceptible animals and derived products. There are no further recommendations.

How extensive is the situation in the affected country and what was the country’s disease status prior to the outbreak?

Korea MapThe South Korean Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries notified the OIE on March 27, 2000 of a suspected outbreak of FMD on a dairy farm in the city of Paju, Kyonggi-do province, 20 km northeast of Seoul. Clinical illness of a vesicular disease affecting 15 milk cows was first noted on March 20, 2000. The 15 affected animals and all susceptible animals on six adjacent farms have been destroyed. FMD virus type O is suspected following initial testing. A quarantine has been placed on all farms within a 10 km radius of the affected farm. On March 30th, the Korean government declared the outbreak contained having not found the disease in animals tested within a 20 kilometer radius of Paju. The last outbreak of FMD in South Korea occurred in 1934. The USDA recognized South Korea as free of FMD, although South Korea fell into a special category because South Korea may import ruminants, swine, or meat from countries that are not recognized as free of FMD. USDA does not, however, recognize South Korea as free of major swine diseases such as classical swine fever and swine vesicular disease.

Source: Report to the OIE, press releases

What is the country’s place in the international market for affected animals and animal products?

South Korea is a minor producer of beef/veal, pig meat, ovine meat, and dairy products, generally accounting for less than 1% of world production (see table B below).

What is the country’s production and trade in affected animals and animal products?

South Korea has about 2.5 million cattle, 7.9 million pigs, 0.5 million goats and a small number of sheep (table A). South Korea exported only 400 live cattle, 1,483 pigs, and no goats or sheep in 1998. The destination of these exported animals was not reported. South Korea imported small numbers of cattle and pigs and no goats or sheep in 1998. The origin of the imported swine was not reported.

Table A: Stocks and Trade in Live Animals, Korea

Live Animal

1999 Stocks

Trade

1998 Exports

1998 Imports

Head

% World

Head

% World

Head

% World

Cattle

2,486,495

400

3

Pigs

7,863,655

1,483

406

Goats

538,539

0

0

Sheep

1,242

0

0

South Korea accounts for only a small amount of the world’s production of beef/veal, pig meat, ovine meat, and dairy products. Production statistics by province were not available but South Korean sources report that the Kyonggi-do province specializes in dairy farming to meet the needs of urban areas like Seoul. Pork production is also reported in Kyonggi-do province. Within South Korea there are an estimated 375,000 households with cattle holding an average of 5.6 head each and a total of 24,400 swine operations holding approximately 300 head each.

South Korean exports of beef/veal, ovine meat, and dairy products are negligible. South Korea accounts for almost 2% of world pigmeat exports, exporting over 10% of its pig meat production. The vast majority of South Korea's pigmeat exports go to Japan.

South Korea imported more pig meat than beef and veal in 1998. As a proportion of world imports, however, South Korea's beef and veal imports account for approximately 3% of world imports while South Korea's pig meat imports account for approximately 1% of world imports. The US and Australia are the predominant suppliers of beef and veal to South Korea. Denmark, the US, Belgium and France supply pig meat to South Korea with Denmark being the leading supplier.

Table B: Production and Trade in Meat and Dairy, Korea

Meat and Dairy

1999 Production

Trade

1998 Exports

1998 Imports

Metric Ton

% World

Metric Ton

% World

Metric Ton

% World

Beef and veal

239,721

65

52,039

Pig meat

740,836

113,646

67,226

Mutton and lamb

6

3,438

8,191

Goat meat

3,300

0

9

Milk, total

2,134,995

5,208

293,908

Source: United Nations FAO; USDA-FAS, website: www.kois.go.kr

What are the U.S. imports of affected animals or animal products from the country?

Relevant animals and products imported into the US from South Korea in 1999 and January 2000 are listed in Appendix A. No live cattle, pigs, sheep, or goats or meat from these animals were imported during this time. An unknown number of other, nonlivestock animals were imported from South Korea during 1999.

Small quantities of dairy products, animal feeds, and hides and skins were imported from South Korea during 1999 and January 2000.

To protect US agricultural interests, USDA, APHIS, VS, NCIE issued an interim rule, effective March 29, 2000, prohibiting the importation of FMD-susceptible animals and derived products from South Korea. No further actions are recommended at this time.

Source: World Trade Atlas

What is the level of passenger traffic arriving in the United States from the affected country?

A total of 1.1 million passengers arrived in the US on direct flights from South Korea in 1998. As part of APHIS-PPQ’s Agricultural Quarantine Inspection monitoring, 2,139 passengers arriving from South Korea were sampled for restricted items. Of these, 72 passengers (3.4%) were found to be carrying a total of 76 kg of potentially relevant products, including beef, pork, and other meat items. None of the 72 passengers reported plans to visit or work on a farm or ranch while in the US.

Sources: US Dept of Transportation; APHIS-PPQ

CEI’s plans for follow up:

CEI currently has no plans to provide additional information on this situation; however, if the situation should change significantly, follow-up information will be provided. If you seek more information or wish to comment on this worksheet, please contact Judy Akkina at (970) 490-7852 or Chris Kopral at (970) 490-7819.

Appendix A

Relevant Animal Products Imported from South Korea Into the U.S.

1999

January 2000

01 Live Animals

0106005080 other live animals: animals, live, nesoi (U.S. dollars)

$72,000

0

04 Dairy

0404102000 whey, whether or not concentrated or sweetened, fluid (liters)

71,244

0

0410000000 edible products of animal origin, not elsewhere specified or included (kg)

460

10

05 Other of Animal Origin

0506900040 powder & waste of bones and horn-cores (kg)

125

0

0511992000 parings & similar waste of raw hides or skins; glue stock, not elsewhere specified or included (kg)

138,707

998

0511993060 products chiefly used as food for animals or as ingredients in such food, nesoi (kg)

38,885

8,014

0511994050 animal products not elsewhere specified or included; dead animals of chapter 1, unfit for human consumption (kg)

864

0

23 Food Waste, Animal Feed

2309901050 mixed feeds or mixed feed ingredients used in animal feedings, nesoi (tons)

0

1

2309909500 preparations of a kind used in animal feeding, nesoi (kg)

1,005

0

41 Hides & Skins

4101100000 hides & skins of bovine animal, whole, weight per skin not over 8 kg dried, 10 kg dry-salted, or 14 kg fresh, wet salted or otherwise preserved (number)

145

0

4101300090 hides & skins of bovine animal, nesoi, dried, limed, pickled or otherwise preserved, but not tanned, parchment-dressed or further prepared (number)

68

0

4103900090 hides & skins, nesoi, fresh or salted, dried, limed, pickled or otherwise preserved, but not tanned, parchment dressed or further prepared (U.S. dollars)

$1,000

0



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