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BSE_ Slovakia 10_9_01

CEI Logo Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy, Slovakia

Impact Worksheet, October 9, 2001


Summary:

BSE was confirmed on October 4 in a 6-year old cow in Slovakia. The cow was detected as part of regular sampling for BSE in slaughter cattle. This is the first case of BSE in Slovakia.

Slovakia had less than 0.1 percent of the world’s stocks in cattle, goats, and sheep in 2000 . Slovakia’s meat exports are minimal; however, exports of live animals number in the tens of thousands. Destination countries for the live animal exports were not specified. No products that would be of risk for transmission of BSE were imported into the US from Slovakia during 2000 or 2001. In 1998 and 1999, small quantities of animals feeds were imported from Slovakia; however, it is not known whether these feeds contained ruminant materials.

In December 1997, APHIS prohibited the importation of live ruminants and most ruminant products from all of Europe including Slovakia. In December 2000, import restrictions regarding BSE were expanded by prohibiting all imports of rendered animal protein products, regardless of species, from Europe.

BSE Slovakia

How extensive is the outbreak of BSE in Slovakia?

It was reported by Reuters that BSE was confirmed on October 4 in a 6-year old cow in Slovakia. The cow was detected as part of regular sampling for BSE in slaughter cattle. Confirmation was done by the Research Laboratory for Viral Diseases of Animals in Tuebingen, Germany. This is the first case of BSE in Slovakia.

Using trace-back, it was determined that the positive cow was transported to the slaughterhouse on September 24, and originated from a farm with about 200 cows, located in Horná Zdana in the Ziar nad Hronom district. The district veterinary authorities immediately isolated the farm and banned any movement of animals to and from the farm.

Source: OIE Weekly Disease Information Report, Sep 28, 2001; Reuters, Oct 4, 2001

What actions has Slovakia taken to protect its livestock from BSE?

Imports of cattle, beef, and beef products from countries with BSE are banned by Slovakia. However, it is not clear when this ban was enacted, as small numbers of live cattle from France (which has had cases of BSE since 1991) were imported as recently as 1999.

Meat and bone meal (MBM) has reportedly not been fed to ruminants for many years because it is too expensive. Even so, a ban on the feeding of MBM to ruminants was implemented in 1994. Some MBM for feeding to non-ruminants has been imported, primarily from Austria.

Testing for BSE began in 1996. Brains were tested from cattle exhibiting unusual behavior, cattle that are fallen, and ‘emergency slaughter’ cattle. Since the appearance of BSE in the Czech Republic in June 2001, Slovakia has been testing all slaughtered cows aged over 30 months.

Source: USDA, FAS, Slovak Measure to Prevent BSE, Mar 2, 2001; Reuters, Oct 4, 2001

What is Slovakia’s production and trade in affected animals and animal products?

Slovakia had less than 0.1 percent of the world’s stocks in cattle, goats, and sheep in 2000 (Table 1). Slovakia exported 120,000 live cattle, goats, and sheep in 1999. Destination countries for the live animal exports were not specified. Slovakia had less than 0.1 percent of imports of cattle, goats, and sheep in 1999.

Table 1. Slovakia’s live animal stocks and imports and exports of live animals.

Live Animal

2000 Stocks

Trade

1999 Exports

1999 Imports

Head

% World

Head

% World

Head

% World

Cattle

665,055

0.05

12,556

0.13

150

Goats

51,075

30,501

1.1

560

Sheep

340,346

0.03

77,246

0.43

810

Slovakia had less than 0.1 percent of the world’s 2000 production of beef and veal, mutton and lamb, and goat meat in 2000 (Table 2). Slovakia also had less than 0.1 percent of world exports of beef and veal, and mutton and lamb, and imports of beef and veal in 1999. Quantities were not available for goat meat imports and exports or mutton and lamb imports.

Table 2. Production and trade in relevant products by Slovakia.

Products

2000 Production

Trade

1999 Exports

1999 Imports

Metric ton

% World

Metric ton

% World

Metric ton

% World

Beef and Veal

42,932

0.08

144

2,993

0.06

Mutton and Lamb 1

1,476

0.02

109

0.01

-

-

Goat Meat 1

110

-

-

-

-

Source: United Nations FAO

1 Sheep and goats were included in Table 1 and Table 2 as ‘affected’ animals because USDA/APHIS includes all ruminants and ruminant products in its restrictions pertaining to BSE.

What are the U.S. imports of affected animals or animal products from Slovakia?

No products that would be of risk for transmission of BSE were imported into the US from Slovakia during 2000 or 2001. Small quantities of animals feeds were imported during 1998 and 1999; however, it is not known whether these feeds contained ruminant materials (Table 3). Canada and Mexico did not import any items of risk from Slovakia in 1998, 1999, 2000, or 2001.

Table 3. U.S. Imports from Slovakia

1998

1999

Value ($millions)

Quantity

Value ($millions)

Quantity

mixed feeds or mixed feed ingredients used in animal feedings, nesoi

0.350

0.509

preparations of a kind used in animal feeding, nesoi

0.000

0.013

Source: World Trade Atlas

Did the US have restrictions on ruminant imports from Slovakia prior to this case?

In December 1997, APHIS prohibited the importation of live ruminants and most ruminant products from all of Europe including Slovakia until a thorough assessment of the risks of introduction of BSE into the US could be made. Prior to December 1997, import restrictions were applied only to those countries which had reported cases of BSE in native animals. Also, importation of ruminant meat from BSE-affected countries was permitted if the meat was deboned and free of visually identifiable lymphatic and nervous tissue and if it met other restrictions. Import regulations enacted December 1997 extended the import restrictions to countries that had not had a declared case of BSE, yet had risk factors for occurrence of BSE.

These regulatory changes also removed the provisions which allowed importation of ruminant meat from the restricted countries, essentially prohibiting the importation of ruminant meat from all of Europe. These import restrictions also applied to bone meal, blood meal, meat meal, offal, fat, glands, and serum from ruminants . In December 2000, APHIS expanded its import restrictions regarding BSE by prohibiting all imports of rendered animal protein products, regardless of species, from Europe.

Source: USDA, APHIS, VS

What is the level of passenger traffic arriving in the United States from Slovakia?

There were no direct flights from Slovakia to the US in fiscal year 2000.

Under APHIS-PPQ’s agriculture quarantine inspection monitoring, 42 air passengers from Slovakia were sampled for items of agricultural interest in fiscal year 2000. None of these passengers were carrying meat (non-pork) items that could potentially harbor the pathogen(s) that cause BSE .

Source: US Department of Transportation, and APHIS-PPQ Agricultural Quarantine Inspection data base

CEI’s plans for follow up:

CEI is trying to ascertain the destination countries of Slovakia’s live animal exports and will send out a brief message with this information. If you need more information or want to comment on this worksheet, you may reply to this message or contact Ken Geter at (970) 490-7817 or Chris Kopral at (970) 490-7819 .



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