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Contagious Equine Metritis

   
 

May 2013 Case - Puerto Rico
In May 2013, the USDA's National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) confirmed that a Thoroughbred mare in Puerto Rico was positive for Taylorella equigenitalis, the bacterium that causes contagious equine metritis (CEM). The NVSL determined that the T. equigenitalis isolate from this mare matched a strain detected previously in Europe and in the United States, most recently in an Arabian stallion in Arizona in 2011. >> Read More

February 2013 Cases - California
In February 2013, the USDA's National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) confirmed that a Lusitano mare in south-central California was positive for Taylorella equigenitalis, the bacterium that causes contagious equine metritis (CEM). The NVSL also determined that the strain of the bacterium does not match any T. equigenitalis strains ever found in the United States, indicating this case is not related to any previous U.S. cases of CEM. >> Read More

July 2011 Case - Arizona
In July 2011, the USDA's National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) confirmed that an Arabian stallion on a central Arizona premises was positive for Taylorella equigenitalis, the bacterium that causes contagious equine metritis (CEM). The NVSL has also determined that the strain of the bacterium does not match any T. equigenitalis strains recently found in the United States, indicating this case is not related to the California CEM case in May 2010, the multi-State CEM outbreak detected in late 2008, or imported stallions found positive in 2006. >> Read More

May 2010 Case - California
In May 2010, the USDA's National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) confirmed that an Arabian stallion on a southern California premises was positive for Taylorella equigenitalis, the bacterium that causes contagious equine metritis (CEM). A thorough epidemiologic and diagnostic investigation was carried out to determine the origin of the CEM bacterium. Final analysis of all the epidemiologic and diagnostic findings from the investigation indicated that the positive Arabian stallion was contaminated with T. equigenitalis prior to his arrival in the United States and that no further spread of the bacterium occurred after he arrived. The positive imported stallion successfully completed antibiotic treatment and was confirmed to be free of T. equigenitalis. >> Read More

December 2008 Outbreak - California, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Texas, and Wisconsin
In December 2008, a Quarter Horse stallion on a central Kentucky premises was confirmed by the USDA's National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) as positive for Taylorella equigenitalis, the bacterium that causes contagious equine metritis (CEM). A thorough epidemiologic and diagnostic investigation was carried out to determine the origin of the CEM bacterium. Final analysis of all the epidemiologic and diagnostic findings from the investigation indicated that a stallion imported from Denmark in late 2000 was the likely source of the outbreak. The source stallion and 27 other horses found positive in the outbreak were all successfully treated with antibiotics and confirmed as free of T. equigenitalis. >> Read More

What is CEM?

Contagious Equine Metritis (CEM) is a sexually transmitted disease among horses caused by a bacteria Taylorella equigenitalis. Clinical signs may include a mucopurulent vaginal discharge in up to 40% of affected mares, abortion and infertility. Stallions typically show no clinical signs. Stallions and mares can become chronic carriers of CEM and be sources of infection for future outbreaks. The transmission rate is high and naturally occurs by mating, but contaminated instruments and equipment may be an indirect source of infecting mares and stallions. The bacteria can also be spread via semen collected for artificial insemination.

What happens to CEM positive horses? 

CEM can be treated with disinfectants and antibiotics. CEM-positive mares, and mares from CEM-positive countries, are required to go through a treatment protocol and remain in quarantine for no less than 21 days. Stallions that have CEM or come from a CEM-positive country are required to remain quarantined until a treatment protocol is completed and they test negative for the disease.

Publications

 
 

Contagious Equine Metritis
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Contagious Equine Metritis: Q&A's
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