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CSF in Great Britain

CEI LogoClassical Swine Fever, Great Britain

Impact Worksheet, 11 August 2000


Summary:
An outbreak of classical swine fever (CSF) was confirmed in Suffolk County, England on 8 August 2000. The affected premises houses approximately 3,500 six-to-eight week old pigs. Prior to this outbreak, Great Britain (England, Scotland, Wales, and Isle of Man) was considered by the USDA to be free of CSF. As of 11 August, it is premature to speculate on whether or not this outbreak may spread. Until more information becomes available, restricting imports of live swine, pork, and blood products from Great Britain is warranted.

The United Kingdom (UK) had about 7.3 million swine in 1999, accounting for 8 percent of world swine stocks. In 1999, the UK exported over 175 thousand live swine, and 218 thousand metric tons of pig meat. UK exports of live swine and swine products went primarily to EU countries. The US imported live swine from the United Kingdom in 1999, but none in 2000. Frozen pork was imported from the UK in both 1999 and 2000. In 1998, 8.25 million passengers arrived in the US on direct flights from the UK; 3.97 million of these were UK residents.

Suffolk and surrounding counties in England

CSF UK CSF UK 2

How extensive is the situation in the affected country and what was the country’s disease status prior to the outbreak?

An outbreak of classical swine fever (CSF) was confirmed on August 8, 2000 in Great Britain near the town of Woodbridge, Suffolk County (map). The affected premises houses approximately 3,500 six-to-eight week old pigs in 7 sheds. Two hundred (200) of 1,200 pigs in one shed were clinically affected. Pigs in another shed of 240 were also showing signs of disease at the time of investigation. The premises operates as a nursery for breeding farms under the same ownership and is believed to be on an all-in, all-out management system. The United Kingdom Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF) has implemented a 3-km protection zone and a 10-km surveillance zone around the affected premises. According to a MAFF information notice, "restrictions orders have also been placed on two further holdings in Essex and Norfolk."

The last previously reported outbreak of CSF in Great Britain occurred in 1987. Great Britain was considered by the USDA to be free of CSF.

What is the country’s production and trade in affected animals and animal products?

The UK had about 7.3 million swine in 1999, accounting for 8% of world swine stocks (Table 1). The UK exported over 175 thousand live swine, and 218 thousand metric tons of pig meat.

UK exports of live swine in 1999 went almost exclusively to EU countries, notably the Irish Republic, Germany, and the Netherlands (in rank order). Canada, Japan, and the US each imported several hundred live swine from the UK.

About 85% of pig meat exports in 1999 went to EU countries, primarily Germany, the Netherlands, and France. The top 5 countries outside of the EU that imported pig meat from the UK were Hong Kong, Japan, Russia, Poland, and the US.

Table 1: Production and trade in live pigs and pork products, United Kingdom, 1999

United Kingdom

% of World*

Live pigs

Stocks (# head)

7,284,000

8

Imports

165,795

Exports

175,703

Pork products

Production (mt)

1,048,000

1

Imports (mt)

452,482

Exports (mt)

217,928

Source: UN Food and Agriculture Organization; USDA, FAS
* World percentages for trade are approximate because world imports/exports were 1998, while UK imports/exports were 1999.

What are the US imports of affected animals or animal products from the country?

The US imported live swine from the United Kingdom in 1999, but none in 2000 (Table 2). Frozen pork was imported from the UK in both 1999 through May 2000, the most recent month for which data are available. Swine offal and hog bristles have also been imported. No fresh pork imports from the UK have been reported since 1998 when the US imported 35,790 kg of fresh boneless pork valued at $38,000.

Table 2: US imports of live pigs and pig products from the UK, 1999 through May 2000

Product

1999

2000 (January - May)

quantity

$ value (million)

quantity

$ value (million)

Live swine, purebred breeding (number of head)

93

0.01

0

0

Live swine, not purebred breeding, >50 kg (number of head)

270

0.08

0

0

Pork, frozen cut boneless (kg)

2,320,729

8.44

990,429

3.66

Pork, frozen cuts + bones (kg)

1,014,481

2.91

109,113

0.58

Pork, frozen carcasses (kg)

46,119

0.08

46,236

0.08

Edible animal offal, frozen swine (kg)

17,904

0.03

0

0

Hair or bristles of hog or badger (kg)

35,779

0.94

34,884

0.58

Source : World Trade Atlas, May 2000 and December 1999

What is the level of passenger traffic arriving in the United States from the affected country?

In 1998, 8.25 million passengers arrived in the US on direct flights from the UK. Of these, 3.97 million were UK residents. There were 35,811 nonstop flights from the UK to the US in 1997.

Mechanical transmission of CSF virus is negligible because the amount of virus present is generally less then the infective dose. Thus, passenger traffic is significant not in and of itself, but because it reflects the amount of potentially contaminated product that passengers are carrying.

A total of 20,515 passengers from the UK were sampled as part of APHIS, PPQ’s Agriculture Quarantine Inspection Monitoring in fiscal year 1999. Of these passengers from the UK, 262, or 1.3 percent, were carrying a total of 658 kg of pork or unspecified meat items such as bacon, sausage, or meat sandwich. By comparison, 2.8 percent of sampled passengers from all countries were carrying pork or unspecified meat items. Three of the sampled passengers from the UK who were carrying potentially hazardous items reported plans to visit or work on a farm or ranch while in the US; their reported destination was Georgia.

Source: US Department of Transportation, and APHIS-PPQ Agricultural Quarantine Inspection Monitoring data base

CEI’s plans for follow up:

CEI will be prepared to provide more information as needed regarding consequences of this outbreak. If you seek more information or wish to comment on this worksheet, contact Chris Kopral at (970) 490-7819, or David Cummings at (970) 490-7895.



Additional Information