The Threat

The Threat

It's up to each of us to help stop hungry pests.

Hungry pests are invasive species that threaten to harm our crops and trees. Left unchecked, they can devastate entire agricultural industries, eliminating jobs, threatening our food supplies and costing billions.

There are things that each of us can do to help stop the spread. It's up to each of us to be sure that we're not packing a pest when we move things outdoors, go camping, or travel internationally.

Please do your part and be aware of any regulations and potential risks in your area. And if you see a pest, report it. With your help, we can protect so much that we value.

Top Invasive Pest Threats

Asian Citrus Psyllid

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Tiny, gnat-sized insect carries a bacterium that causes citrus greening disease. Its spread is a serious threat to America's citrus plants.

Places with Federal Quarantine(s): America's citrus producing states

What's at risk: Citrus plants and citrus plant relatives

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Asian Gypsy Moth

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The caterpillars may attack more than 500 tree and shrub species and could cause serious damage to our landscapes and natural resources.

Places with Federal Quarantine(s): None

What's at risk: A wide variety of North American trees and shrubs

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Asian Longhorned Beetle

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Threatens hardwood trees, urban and suburban shade trees, and forest resources valued at billions of dollars.

Places with Federal Quarantine(s):  Massachusetts, New York and Ohio

What's at risk:  Hardwood trees

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Citrus Greening

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Citrus greening threatens America's citrus.  Don't risk citrus, don't move citrus.

Places with Federal Quarantine(s):  6 states

What's at risk:  Citrus trees

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Coconut Rhinoceros Beetle

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Coconut rhinoceros beetles kill palms and other important plants. Learn to recognize the damage and report it.

Places with Federal Quarantine(s):  None

What's at risk:  Many species of palm trees, including coconut, date, and oil palms, and a number of crops.

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Emerald Ash Borer Beetle

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Responsible for the destruction of tens of millions of ash trees in 30 states. There is no known treatment – trees must be felled and disposed of.

Places with Federal Quarantine(s):  30 states

What's at risk:  Ash trees

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European Grapevine Moth

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The European grapevine moth is a threat to America's grapes. Don't move fresh fruits, vegetables or plants.

Places with Federal Quarantine(s):  None

What's at risk:  All varieties of wine and table grapes.

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European Gypsy Moth

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The caterpillars attack more than 300 species of trees and shrubs, posing a danger to North America's forests.

Places with Federal Quarantine(s):  19 states and the District of Columbia

What's at risk:  More than 300 species of trees and shrubs

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False Codling Moth

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A threat to many of our fruits, vegetables and other crops. It can survive in climates that are tropical, dry or temperate.

Places with Federal Quarantine(s):  Currently not in the U.S., but 20% of the country is at risk

What's at risk:  More than 100 plants, fruit trees and crops

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Giant African Snail

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One of the most damaging snails in the world. Reproduces quickly, producing about 1,200 eggs in a single year.

Places with Federal Quarantine(s):  Florida and Hawaii

What's at risk:  More than 500 types of plants, plus plaster and stucco

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Imported Fire Ant

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These small ants eat crops and have a fearsome sting. Their large nests can damage agricultural equipment.

Places with Federal Quarantine(s):  Most of the southeastern U.S., California, New Mexico and Puerto Rico.

What's at risk:  Corn, soybean, okra and citrus, among other crops

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Khapra Beetle

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This tiny beetle is a destructive pest of stored grain and other dried plant—as well as animal—products.

Places with Federal Quarantine(s):  Not currently in the U.S. but often detected and destroyed in passenger baggage and cargo.

What's at risk:  Stored grains

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Light Brown Apple Moth

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Damages Avocado, beans, certain berries, grape and many plants found in backyard gardens.

Places with Federal Quarantine(s):  California and Hawaii

What's at risk:  More than 2,000 species of plants and trees and 250 agricultural crops

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Mediterranean Fruit Fly

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Considered one of the most damaging agricultural pests in the world. Infests commercial and garden fruits, nuts and vegetables.

Places with Federal Quarantine(s)  Hawaii

What's at risk:  Hundreds of varieties of fruits, vegetables and nuts

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Mexican Fruit Fly

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A serious threat to commercially grown crops, including avocado, grapefruit, orange, peach, pear, citrus and mango.

Places with Federal Quarantine(s):  Not known to be in the U.S.

What's at risk:  More than 50 fruits and vegetables

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Old World Bollworm

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Old world bollworm feeds on a wide range of plants and high-value crops. It is a significant threat to U.S. agriculture.

Places with Federal Quarantine(s):
 None

What's at risk: 
Corn, cotton, small grains, soybeans, peppers, and tomatoes, among others.

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Oriental Fruit Fly

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Known to attack many fruits and vegetables, including apricots, cherries, citrus, figs, peaches, pears, plums and tomatoes.

Places with Federal Quarantine(s):  Hawaii

What's at risk:
 More than 230 types of fruits and vegetables

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Spotted Lanternfly

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This plant hopper feeds on a wide range of plants and trees. It is a serious threat to grape, apple, oak, walnut, poplar, stone fruit and logging industries.

Places with Federal Quarantine(s):  None

What's at risk:  Grapes, ochard fruits, and trees

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Sudden Oak Death

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Sudden oak death threatens many of our trees. Learn to spot it and report it.

Places with Federal Quarantine(s):  California and Oregon

What's at risk:  A wide variety of trees, including hardwoods, softwoods and certain landscape ornamental plants.

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