APHIS Office - Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

APHIS Office - Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

The staff of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) at the APHIS Mexfly office in Tijuana, (Baja California, Mexico), in conjunction with our colleagues at the Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) Mexico office, represent the interests of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) in Mexico. The APHIS office plays a unique role in both the protection of U.S. agriculture and in the facilitation of safe trade between both countries.  The APHIS Mexfly office tracks the location and spread of the Mexican Fruit Fly (Mexfly) in order to prevent introduction into the United States where it can damage U.S. fruit crops.

Growing agricultural trade between the United States and Mexico has created a vital role for APHIS ensuring that new trade opportunities are realized and that existing trade between the two economies flows smoothly. The APHIS Mexico City office maintains technical working relationships with our Mexican counterparts to resolve Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) issues whenever they arise.

In addition, our office maintains direct contact with industry trade groups. This relationship contributes to maintaining the success of agricultural trade-related commercial activities between the two economies, helping ensure that they thrive. For example, APHIS provides certification at origin of a large number of Mexican commodities exported to the U.S., seeks to expand and maintain market access for U.S. agricultural products and also intervenes directly for shipments detained at Mexican ports of entry.

A principle role of APHIS is to make sure the United States and our trading partners adhere to the SPS rules set forth by the World Trade Organization (WTO), as well as the other relevant international standards-setting organizations, APHIS' role will continue to increase as the United States and Mexico continue to expand their current trade relationships and establish new partnerships into the foreseeable future.

A final but critical function of our APHIS office is to help protect U.S. agriculture from the establishment and/or spread of harmful plant pests and animal diseases where our office works in close cooperation with our Mexican plant and animal health counterparts and key industry groups in a number of areas of mutual interest and benefit. Because of a long, shared common border with similar agricultural production, climatic and environmental factors, the two countries have demonstrated a very successful history of working collaboratively since the 1940's with the eradication of Foot and Mouth Disease in livestock. More recently, both sides collaborate on fruit fly control and eradication, cotton pest eradication and in Citrus Greening disease monitoring and through the development of control strategies. On the animal side, APHIS cooperates in providing technical assistance and enhanced diagnostics of foreign animal diseases such as High Pathogenic Avian Influenza and Classical Swine Fever including the control of bovine tuberculosis and cattle fever ticks in livestock and with efforts to control rabies in wildlife.

 

APHIS

 

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About APHIS

The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service is a multifaceted Agency with a broad mission area that includes protecting and promoting U.S. agricultural health, regulating genetically engineered organisms, administering the Animal Welfare Act and carrying out wildlife damage management activities. These efforts support the overall mission of USDA, which is to protect and promote food, agriculture, natural resources and related issues.

 

Contact Us

 

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Sergio Sanchez, Agricultural Specialist


 


Location News

  • APHIS-IS Successful and Collaborative Work in Mexico

    June 19, 2017 - APHIS IS/Mexico City and the APHIS Trade Support Team visited the IS/Tijuana Area Office (TAO) to review safeguarding activities: fruit fly trapping and laboratory identifications, Asian Citrus Psyllid (ACP), and Agriculture Quarantine and Inspection. With the many fruits grown in Mexico for export to the United States, APHIS’ IS safeguarding activities have played an important role in facilitating cross-border trade of perishable products by successfully controlling populations of Mediterranean and Mexican fruit flies in the production areas that supply fresh fruits and vegetables to the United States. The ACP program aims to control the spread of the Psyllid in the urban areas along the border where citrus trees are in many back yards. IS/TAO also conducts inspection work at the three wholesale markets, the central bus station, and the International Airport in Tijuana, where they partner with SENASICA and Baja California state officials to intercept illegal transport of fruit.

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